In the News

Russians Revel

Putin' on the Ritz!

Things are really heating up with Russian collusion, after the President of the United States showed incredible weakness to Vladimir Putin in Helsinki. Press was allowed to ask questions after closed door (to Americans) meeting, where Trump showed the obedience of a lost puppy to the Russian leader, while bad mouthing the US and it's Security institutions. Russians and Avenatti are pretty much the only ones who never have a bad word. Wonder why?

FART ACT

Is it just a bunch of hot air?

The Trump draft of the "FART ACT" bill is written to abandon world trade rules and change the way the world does business with the United States. Trump and his administration have been meddling in the economy, but what is the end goal? Why would all of these horrible economic actions need to be taken of Trump really cares about the USA? Its possible he is taking orders from Putin, who would love to see the United States dissolved.

Michael Cohen

I do what I want.

CNN is saying: Michael Cohen must be making Donald Trump very nervous right about now, and they are probably right. Cohen, Trumps "fixer", had this to say "My wife, my daughter and my son have my first loyalty and always will ... I put family and country first.", which has fueled speculation that he will "turn" on Trump. Illegal activity, like paying hush money to Stormy Daniels, can be traced to Cohen - but the crimes do not stop there.

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Lot of Dreamers out there

Anonymous's picture
Dear Mr. President, I think it's good that you are trying to help the Dreamers. At least in any way you can. However, I think you are missing the point about the vast number of Dreamers. Unfortunately, many can not be accounted for. The political debate over the fate of "DREAMers" — undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children — has overlooked just how many there are in the country today: about 3.6 million. That number of people whose lives risk being uprooted is not widely known, in large part because so much public attention has been focused recently on 800,000 mostly young DREAMers accepted into the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. This smaller group of DREAMers is in the spotlight because you terminated DACA last September. You thought it was an illegal overreach of executive authority that can only come from Congress. I beg to differ. It is also NOT compromising on the initial immigration plan either. The 3.6 million estimate of undocumented immigrants brought to U.S. before their 18th birthday comes from the Migration Policy Institute, a non-partisan, non-profit think tank that studies global immigration patterns. That is roughly a third of all undocumented immigrants in the country and does not include millions of their immediate family members who are U.S. citizens. A number so large raises the stakes for both sides in the dispute over whether to deport DREAMers, allow them to stay under prescribed conditions or provide them with a path to citizenship. Ali Noorani, executive director of the pro-immigrant National Immigration Forum, said exposing millions of DREAMers to deportations would be a moral and economic calamity. "At a time when our economy is growing and our labor market is extremely tight, these are all folks of working age who have skills to immediately contribute," Noorani said. "We would be spending billions of dollars to remove folks who have the potential to help the country grow." On the other side is Mark Krikorian, executive director for the Center for Immigration Status, which favors lower levels of immigration. He argues for only extending protections for the 800,000 in DACA. "It's not like they're entitled to anything, but prudence suggests an extraordinary act of mercy," he said. "Amnesty is warranted for them alone, at least this time." In exchange for DREAMer protections, Republicans want enhanced border security, the end of a diversity visa program for people from under-represented countries, including several from Africa, and a reduction in relatives that U.S. citizens can sponsor for visas. The impact of what may happen to DREAMers was highlighted this week when Jorge Garcia, 39, a Detroit landscaper who has lived in the U.S. for 30 years, was deported back to his native Mexico even though he arrived in the country when he was 10 years. Garcia, whose wife and two children are all U.S. citizens, did not qualify for DACA because he was just over the age limit. To qualify for DACA, created in 2012, DREAMers had to undergo a thorough background check, prove they arrived in the U.S. before their 16th birthday, were 30 or younger, were attending school or in the military, and had not committed a felony or serious misdemeanor. The program provided work permits and two-year reprieves from deportation that could be renewed. Cecilia Muñoz, Obama's domestic policy director, said he chose to protect a limited number of DREAMers because he could go only so far through executive action. Now that Congress is involved, Muñoz said, far more DREAMers should be protected. "The right policy is to be as generous as possible," Muñoz said. "We know the success of DACA. It's good for the country, and this has overwhelming support around the country from people on both sides of the aisle. There's no reason to limit who is eligible." There are several legislative proposals that each protect different numbers of DREAMers. Some deal only with those who entered the country before their 16th birthday. Others set age limits and include education or military requirements and clean criminal records. According to an analysis by the Migration Policy Institute: •The most generous proposal is the American Hope Act introduced by Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., which would provide legal status to 3.5 million DREAMers, excluding a small group who pose public safety threats. •Another plan known as the DREAM Act (recently presented to you) by a bipartisan group of senators last week would allow 2.1 million to stay in the country. "There is support across the country for allowing Dreamers — who have records of achievement — to stay, work, and reach their full potential," Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said. "We should not squander these young people’s talents and penalize our own nation." •Other proposals from Republicans would protect up to 1.7 million immigrants. •The most restrictive proposals would provide legal status only to the 798,980 people approved for DACA. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has said it will not deport former DACA recipients if their protections expire. But under your current orders, it will arrest any undocumented immigrant agents come across. I am not sure how effective this would be. In it's present form, the percentage of undocumented immigrants without criminal records arrested by ICE has increased dramatically since Trump took office. If Congress does not strike a deal by March 5, DACA enrollees will begin losing their deportation protections and work permits. Please don't let this happen Mr. President. We are counting on you to make a change for the better. For all the Dreamers across the country. Begging You, Berto Cozi
Approval: 
Yes

Comments

Millie Singerline's picture

I don't want them here they hate us all!

By Millie Singerline
Kay Goodwin's picture

Take away all this welfare the illegals get then they would go back on their own. Even some or the permanent residents I know draw unemployment while living in Mexico . They draw social security benefits while living in Mexico ( permanent resident not a citizen of the United State) . This seems to not be right when we the US citizens can't even get assistance when we need it ( elderly and veterans )

By Kay Goodwin

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